Teaching

During my time at Michigan, I taught several courses at the elementary, intermediate, and upper level, including broader curriculum development. I designed and taught a conversation through film class, “Keeping Track of Narcos and Dissidents: Surveillance in Latin America,” a literature course, “Land Battles in Mexico: Reading Crisis and Protest,” and a course in English for the University of Michigan’s general education curriculum titled, “Revolutions and Reproductive Labor: Reorganizing Care in Latin America during the 20th and 21st Centuries.”

Currently being adapted and prepared for publication, I worked collaboratively with 3 colleagues to standardize Michigan’s a proficiency based Spanish conversation course. We created targeted instructional content and student material adaptable to any Spanish conversation through film based course.

This fall 2019, at DePauw University, I have designed a “flipped” first-year communicative and proficiency based sequence in Spanish which incorporates more substantive conversations on race, migration, and the environment into the earliest stages of language acquisition. For the spring 2020 semester, I am building a 200 level Spanish language topics course focusing on migration and the racialization of childhood and the family. Through this lens, we will interrogate the complex causes and realities of migration, including violence, environment, and policy. 

I have also developed upper and graduate level cultural studies courses. Adaptable to the upper 200- 400 levels, I have designed a course titled “Coco and the Calavera” and another conversation through film course titled, “Bleeding Lines: Latin America as a Borderland.” At the honors or graduate level, I have developed a class called X²: Expropriation and Exploitation in Mexico and another on the Columbian Exchange. Finally, I have developed a colonial survey course, “Latin American Colonial Studies:  Foundational Questions of Domination and Rebellion.”

As part of my teaching certificate from the University of Michigan, I received additional training in pedagogy, including Spanish for Heritage Language learners. This has been a dedicated and ongoing area of interest for me ever since I worked closely with a faculty mentor at Albion College to learn more about curriculum design and best practices for heritage speakers and first generation students.